Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 61 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 63 Navigation
YOR: 63 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
his knowledge of the language acquired during his time in the Indian Civil Service, because the texture of the metal lathing caught and reflected the light in the same way as does the sea. As a substitute for the more inflammable wooden lathing used behind plaster on ceilings and walls the new material was eagerly sought by builders as a fire-resisting material.
    Years of steady prosperity followed the partnership between Eckstein and Willmore. The firm's catalogues grew more comprehensive. Pavement and floor lights took pride of place, followed by safety coal plates, staircases, ventilators, stable fittings, ranges, stoves, metal registers, radiators, "Daisy" boilers, Jhilmil and New Jhilmil patent metal lathing.
    This latest invention was also patented in the United States and in Canada, in both of which countries Haywards were gaining a firm foothold following a visit at the end of 1893 by William Eckstein.
    The catalogue of the period, a large cloth-bound volume an inch thick, contained 248 pages. As many as twenty-one medals hung in the glass case in the partners' private office. A telephone had been installed, and a telegraph address, Hayward Brothers, London, adopted.
    It was soon apparent that the increased activities of Hayward Brothers and Eckstein were straining the small partnership of two. With the necessity for William Eckstein to travel frequently about the country and abroad, the business was growing unwieldy.
    In 1896, therefore, it was decided to turn the partnership into a limited liability company. The outlook was promising and the time was ripe for the infusion of new blood and ideas. D. W. McInnes, London Manager of the Carron Iron Company, had long been known to the partners and they invited him to join them. He brought a substantial amount of new business with him as he had considerable connections in the stove and range trade.
    The company was duly incorporated on September 9th 1896, with an authorised capital of £48,000, and the word Limited added to the style. The previous senior partner, William Eckstein,