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frame with corresponding hexagonal cells, but the glass might be made of other form.
    Simple though this sounds, it was not without many headaches and heart-searching that Edward Hayward arrived at this conclusion. But once having done so-- having in his patent brought together in perfect harmony the two family interests, iron and glass-- his efforts were rewarded by a sudden upward surge in the fortunes of his firm. Undoubtedly, this invention represents a turning point in the firm's career. So far, its course had been measured and uninspired but Edward Hayward's patent pavement lights brought startling developments which changed the whole complexion of the business. The modest patent for lock spindles of twenty years before ceased to have any importance in the annals of Hayward Brothers except perhaps as an indication of a change in outlook. The patent of 1852 had been concerned with making locks more effective. The new patent was for a more positive invention designed to admit light and to throw open the darkest corners to sky and sunshine.
    Edward Hayward's invention revolutionised basement lighting, which had been a continual source of worry to builders and architects for some years. Many had tried to overcome the difficulty by forming areas covered with wrought iron gratings but here the problem of making a basement water-tight immediately arose. The gratings were uncomfortable to stand or walk upon, being particularly unpopular with the fair sex with small shoe heels. Slight improvement was achieved by making wrought angle and tee bar frames glazed with slabs of rough cast glass which served the useful purpose of admitting a certain amount of daylight. This method was followed by the triangular deck lights with a fillet or flange of glass round the outside to give them a seating in the adjoining floor or deck. Although this made for strength, it was discovered upon scientific calculation that the reflecting properties were negligible and the direct downward rays of light were simply thrown back again from the sloping faces on either side. Edward Hayward, confronted with this dilemma,