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the welfare of workers but in the results achieved in the factory itself. The canteen quickly developed into a club where billiards and other pastimes could be enjoyed. A stand was erected on the football ground and soon the firm's team was making its mark in senior League football.
    In the works, the Sash and Casement Departments were transferred to new shop bays in May 1924. Thus, in its own time and upon an organised scale, the production emphasis was moving to Enfield. In 1924, the old foundry shop at Union Street was sold.
    Perhaps by way of comparison a passing reference may be permitted to the small shop standing at this time at the corner of Union Street and Blackfriars Road where the Sign of The Dog's Head in the Pot still marked an ironmonger's. Others of this ancient trade had come and gone since the Hayward brothers quitted the premises many years before. It was a small self-contained undertaking and few who daily made their way down Union Street realised the relation of this small shop to the history of Haywards Limited. In seven years, the sign would be taken down and sold to a museum. A few years more, and after a night of horror, the shop would vanish and the sun rise on a heap of rubble. And so this small beginning of Haywards of the Borough would be lost among the greater catastrophes of history.
    William Extone, who had been associated for many years with the last Hayward active in the business, died on Boxing Day 1924. He was a man of outstanding character. For forty-seven years he had played a leading part in the firm's history and had stamped his vivid personality upon every facet of its life. Business, however, did not occupy all his time. Born free of the city, he took up his livery in the Stationers' Company early in life and later in that of the Worshipful Company of Tilers and Bricklayers, of which he was elected Master in 1922. Southwark, the home of Haywards, benefited from his services for a number of years as warden of St. Saviour's Church, since raised to the dignity of a