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his letter of notice with "Nothing will give me greater pleasure" scrawled across it.
    Efforts were made at this time to purchase the freehold of Nos. 191/193, Union Street from William Hayward but he placed the value a little high for the directors and as the lease had only seven years to run the existing arrangements whereby the company rented the premises were allowed to continue. Numbers 187/189 were already held on lease direct from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.
    About this time, William Hayward delivered an important lecture to the Architectural Association entitled Interior Lighting in which he dealt scientifically with many aspects of this complex subject. The paper, which was reported in full in The Builder, revealed a technical knowledge of pavement lights which has never been surpassed. It forms the basis of the section of the Encyclopædia Britannica, which quotes Eckstein's lecture as its authority. The paper was reprinted in pamphlet form and distributed throughout the trade so that a greater knowledge of the subject was made available with a corresponding upward reaction on sales.
    An impressive connection of a most diverse nature resulted from the combination of the business brought by McInnes with the already universally known pavement lights and other Hayward productions and the stable fittings and ornamental ironwork brought from Cottam and Willmore. By 1898, agencies had been arranged in Brussels, Antwerp, Nice, Bergen, and in China, Japan and the Argentine.
    As soon as the three businesses had been dove-tailed at the works themselves, avoiding duplication and waste, showrooms were leased in the West End of London for the better exploitation of the whole. The basement in Queen Victoria Street had served its purpose at a time when the efficiency and convenience of the pavement light had not yet been established. But twenty years of advertisement and use had earned a reputation which was now accepted without question. The principle of so lighting