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a couple of ducks, two sorts of vegetables, fish and soup were all cooked at one time in the space of two hours, consuming about 40 feet of gas, costing from 1½d. to 2½d. according to the price of gas."
    The most amusing factor, however, in the text of the advertisement for this stove is the insistence upon the deceptive nature of the apparatus which gave the impression that joints roasted in it were cooked before an open fire.
    While business in the new pavement light was increasing, the existing trade in other products also maintained a steady rise. Gas fitting and bell hanging had been added to the other activities. Ventilators continued to be sold in large quantities. They had changed little from the original design but there was a greater range of choice. Iron ventilators, either plain, painted bronze, japanned bronze or japanned white and gold, were produced, although a new galvanised type was ousting the earlier model. Galvanised ventilators could be plain or finished in white or gold, coloured to match walls or fitted with brass fronts and doors. They differed in price from 4s. for plain iron to 50s. for the more elaborate types.
    Ornamental air bricks, plain iron or galvanised, ranging from 6d. to 5s. each, were also engaging the attention of the brothers. Circular iron staircases with the tread, riser and spandril in one were made in five diameters from 3½ feet to 4½ feet. Straight iron staircases and other iron work, such as pilasters, columns and balconies also came within the scope of the firm's output.
    Coal plates, of which there had been six types in 1865 from solid iron and ventilating to those fitted with glass lenses, had received some undesirable publicity and a greater margin of safety was urged by the highway authorities. Sixteen designs, illuminating or semi-illuminating, were included in the lists at this time. Some were fitted with a safety chain and ring, which Haywards recommended to builders and architects in preference to earlier and cheaper types. The disasters to which a faulty coal plate might lead were freely reported in the Press. Under the