Home Index Site Map Up: Hayward Navigation
Up: Hayward

First: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Dust Jacket Last: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 108 Prev: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 22 Next: Years of Reflection 1783-1953 - Page 24 Navigation
YOR: 24 of 109
·DJ ·28 ·56 ·84
·FC ·29 ·57 ·85
·1 ·30 ·58 ·86
·3 ·31 ·59 ·87
§4 ·32 ·60 ·88
§5 ·33 ·61 ·89
§6 ·34 ·62 ·90
·7 ·35 ·63 ·91
·8 ·36 ·64 ·92
§9 ·37 ·65 ·93
·10 §38 ·66 ·94
·11 ·39 ·67 §95
·12 ·40 §68 ·96
·13 ·41 ·69 ·97
·14 ·42 ·70 ·98
·15 ·43 ·71 ·99
·16 ·44 ·72 ·100
·17 ·45 ·73 ·101
·18 ·46 ·74 ·102
·19 ·47 ·75 ·103
·20 ·48 ·76 ·104
·21 ·49 ·77 ·105
·22 ·50 ·78 ·106
·23 ·51 ·79 ·107
·24 ·52 ·80 §108
·25 ·53 §81
·26 §54 ·82
§27 ·55 ·83
 
some influence over his nephews, Edward and William. The first invention patented by Edward was a new form of lock-spindle and the sale of smoke consumers formed a large part of their early business.
    The second Samuel Hayward survived his father by only four years, dying at the age of fifty-one, in 1830. His interest in Chater and Hayward, as it was now known (Leathley having retired some years before) was retained by his executors until his son, Edward, was old enough to take it over. At this time, he was nineteen years of age and his brother, William, only six.
    Edward Hayward would seem to have spent some time at his uncle James's foundry, which would explain his interest in locks and smoke consumers and the ultimate union of iron and glass as one trade. But it was his other uncle, John Hayward, who was appointed the lad's guardian under their father's will. The second Samuel Hayward had left a small fortune, the bulk of which descended to his elder son, Edward. The will also specified that he should receive either the sum of £5,000 or the business, giving an indication of the value placed on the business at the time. Samuel's wife, Sarah, came into £2,000 with an additional £1,000 for the support of the six daughters and that dubious legacy, the children of her husband's first wife. William, a mere infant at the time of his fathers death, was bequeathed his watch fob.
    John Hayward carried out his trust steadfastly in spite of his preoccupation with the upbringing of two sons of his own, John and George, who, incidentally, later followed him into his decorating business in Newgate Street. James Hayward had also had a son, James Robertson Hayward, and he, in his turn, entered his father's business which became in due course James Hayward and Son.
    During the lifetime of the second Samuel Hayward, Chater and Hayward had changed to Hayward and Chater, probably when Samuel Hayward was made senior partner. But by the time Edward Hayward came of age it had reverted to its former style and so it remained throughout his partnership in the firm. Here, too, the influence of the young man's uncles may be