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was given the task of establishing and running this new base. The year also saw the introduction of a non-slip tread for staircases.
    A threat of further litigation shadowed for Haywards the closing weeks of this eventful year. Fortunately, it was no more than a threat and the dispute was amicably settled. But a darker shadow hovered over the nation as a whole and the same bells which rang in the New Year were soon tolling for the death of the aged Queen.
    May of the following year, 1901, brought an announcement:
"HAYWARD BROTHERS AND ECKSTEIN LTD. have recently purchased the Goodwill, Plant, Patterns, and stock of the 'ALLIANCE VENTILATING COMPANY' late of 17, Bethnal Green Road, E. and have removed same to Union Iron Works, Union Street, Borough, London."
    A tinsmith's shop was built to supply the demands which immediately arose as a result of this acquisition and the name "Alliance" was retained and applied to all types emanating from the designs and patterns purchased.
    This addition to the company's activities came at the same time as J. A. Willmore's decision to retire owing to indifferent health. His resignation was accepted with regret by the directors who knew how well he had assisted the company and how important his flair for organisation had been in modeling the combined character of three companies. In business systems and administration, he was undoubtedly ahead of his contemporaries and many of the methods he introduced sixty years ago have stood the test of time.
    G. F. Pittar was appointed Works Manager at the end of 1901. The newcomer was a qualifier engineer and turned his attention to improvements in the plant and tools, a task which the rapid advancement and adjustments of the last few years had rendered overdue.
    Trade conditions in Scotland, where one of the company's oldest agencies had operated for a great number of years, worsened considerably at this time. "Competition in Scotland gets keener every year," recorded the Secretary, "and prices are now down to